Author Topic: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)  (Read 8445 times)

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Vasha

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Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« on: November 13, 2012, 10:17:34 PM »
Okay, so I still have to ask my professor if I can use this, but I thought I would put it up here for now anyways: for my "The Effects of Culture on Education" class, I have to study the Education System in a culture/school system other than the one in highschool. As in I went to a small suburb private school, so I have to study how people learn in a different type of school. So, I'm doing the school system of England!

And we have a couple people from England here, right? I think? (Tell me if I'm wrong. Then laugh at me and my silly stupidity!)

But, anyways, I would like to know first hand experiences from some people who have gone through the English school system. So pretty much... tell me what kind of school you were at (small, large, private, public, whatever), when you went to school (just cuz it's nice to have that reference), and then just tell me about the experience. I know you can't really compare it to my experience because you didn't have my experience, but just talk about anything! Interesting stories or whatever you feel like!

Really, while the homework is the reason I'm posting this, I wouldn't mind if it just started a giant discussion. I even wouldn't mind if non-English people posted here, as long as I can easily tell the difference.

Let the conversationing begin!

P.S.: Just say so if I'm making absolutely no sense here. I'm feeling like I could've worded this whole thing a lot better. :P

atommo

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2012, 05:24:06 AM »
Well... there are different schools I went to since you have primary and secondary schools, as well as infant school. I guess I'll summarise each of them for you.

In infant school I got taught basic things like reading, writing, simple maths and other basic things. The infant school I went to was public and I'd say medium-small size. I guess I started infant school in September 2000.

In primary school I got taught things like times tables, english literature and slightly more complex maths [which I struggled with quite a bit throughout the first half of primary school, but improved in the second half].
In the final year of Primary school I had to take SATs which are basically ways to judge how good you are in each subject [english, maths and science]. They gave you a level depending on how well you did in the tests with a 5.7 being good and a 3.3 being not too good. [The order went up something like 3.3, 3.5, 3.7, 4.0 etc.]
I started primary school in September 2003 I think. It was a public school.

Finally in Secondary school, to start with I got taught a much wider range of subjects than at Primary. [In primary it was pretty much maths, science, english and a little P.E and sometimes a few other little bits]. In secondary I got taught additional things like Dance, Design and Technology, R.E, History etc.

I think that the aspect of getting to experience all the range of subjects the school could teach is good in a way but after he first year, subjects which you may not enjoy may be taking time out of you that you may have preferred using studying a subject you do enjoy, so I feel it might be better if you could opt out of certain subjects if you so wish after the first year.

In the second part of secondary school I got to choose 4 subjects to do for GCSE [General Certificate of Secondary Education]. There was a wide range of things to choose from, with some subjects that took place in other colleges [Farming, animal care, motor vehicle engineering]. After you chose the subjects you wanted to do, you did those subjects along with maths, science and english [and maybe this subject I had to do called ICT national certificate but that didn't apply to everyone] but everything else was taken off the timetable [which said which lesson to go to at what time/day].

Some subjects chose to do a gradual examination where parts were taken throughout the duration, while others simply had a few exams at the end of Secondary school that determined your grade. It depended on what subjects you chose.

The Secondary school I went to was public and I'd say medium-large. I started in September 2007 and finished around May-June 2012 ;D

Hopefully this is the sort of thing you wanted :vikonsmile:
« Last Edit: November 14, 2012, 04:44:47 PM by atommolo-riddle »
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Dr. Zooks McCoy

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2012, 01:27:15 PM »
I watched the Harry Potter movies, does that count?

Judedeath

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2012, 02:51:23 PM »
I watched the Harry Potter movies, does that count?

...read a book sometime.
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Dr. Zooks McCoy

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2012, 03:07:42 PM »
I watched the Harry Potter movies, does that count?

...read a book sometime.

I read most of them. :D

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2012, 03:20:56 PM »
The capacities of the schools I went to were as follows:

Infant School - 100 students
Primary School - 300 students
Secondary School - 1250 students
College/6th Form - 250 students



Instead of Grades they were all broken up into different years:

Infant School - Reception to Year 2
Primary School - Year 3 to Year 6
Secondary School - Year 7 to Year 11
College/6th Form - Year 12 to Year 13

The ages of the majority of the students in each type of school were (I can specify for each year if you need it):

Infant School - Ages 4 to 7
Primary School - Ages 7 to 11
Secondary School - Ages 11 to 16
College/6th Form - Ages 16 to 18



As for exams I will spilt each school into the name and how they were scored when I was there:

School Type: Infant.
Exam Type: SATS; end of school exams.
How it was scored: Graded with a number such as a '3', then with a letter such as 'a' the higher the number and letter the higher the mark. The number is the primary mark and the letter was secondary; for example, a '5c' would be higher than a '4a' but a '5a' would be higher than a '5c'.

School Type: Primary.
Exam Type: SATS; end of school exams.
How it was scored: Same as above.

School Type: Secondary; Year 7 to Year 9.
Exam Type: SATS; exams done at the end of Year 9, though this is no longer done in some schools.
How it was scored: Same as the first.

More important exams, they result in actual qualifications:

School Type: Secondary; Year 10 and Year 11.
Exam Type: GCSEs; done in modules and through coursework though this may soon change.
How they were scored: They were scored with a letter only U to A*, a certain percent would correspond to a letter. The higher the letter the higher the qualification 'A*' being the highest and 'U' meaning ungraded. Note there were no letters between F and U. (G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, and T are not used.)

School Type: College/6th Form.
Exam Type: A-Levels; done in modules and through coursework.
How they were scored: The same as GCSEs except some other colleges did BTECs instead of A-Levels. I didn't do a BTEC so I don't know how they are done.



6th Form is the same a college but is used when a college is another department within the school and uses the school facilities. It is named in this way: "[Name of school 6th Form is attached to] 6th Form".

I went to a fairly small Secondary school and it's 6th form so the sizes of students attending are less than in other places. The other schools I went to were medium sized I think.

I went to school from 1998 to 2012 Infant school to 6th Form. Ages 4 to 17. At normal comprehensive schools.

If you have any more questions or if I have missed something please say. I would put more in bold but I have to go somewhere.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2012, 03:24:30 PM by The-PurpleOrange »

Vasha

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2012, 04:26:26 PM »
Quote from: The-PurpleOrange
Instead of Grades they were all broken up into different years:

Infant School - Reception to Year 2
Primary School - Year 3 to Year 6
Secondary School - Year 7 to Year 11
College/6th Form - Year 12 to Year 13

The ages of the majority of the students in each type of school were (I can specify for each year if you need it):

Infant School - Ages 4 to 7
Primary School - Ages 7 to 11
Secondary School - Ages 11 to 16
College/6th Form - Ages 16 to 18

This part made me a bit confused. What's the different between the lists? Why are the ages different?

And atommo: I started reading your thing about SATs and I'm like "Dude, I know what an SAT is. We have those hear." And then I read the grading system (and when you take them) and I'm like... "Oh, that's something different."

Thank you all! :D

atommo

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2012, 04:43:37 PM »
Quote from: The-PurpleOrange
Instead of Grades they were all broken up into different years:

Infant School - Reception to Year 2
Primary School - Year 3 to Year 6
Secondary School - Year 7 to Year 11
College/6th Form - Year 12 to Year 13

The ages of the majority of the students in each type of school were (I can specify for each year if you need it):

Infant School - Ages 4 to 7
Primary School - Ages 7 to 11
Secondary School - Ages 11 to 16
College/6th Form - Ages 16 to 18

This part made me a bit confused. What's the different between the lists? Why are the ages different?

The top list is school years, whereas the bottom list is the age of people.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2012, 04:45:50 PM by atommolo-riddle »
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Vasha

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2012, 05:09:56 PM »
Ooooooooooooh, gotcha. That makes sense! Danke, y'all!

Vasha

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2012, 05:22:00 PM »
Hey, guys, I was wondering if you could help clarify something for me. Not sure, cuz it's kind of a weird question, but here goes:

I have an article from 2009 that says the following:

Quote
Responsibility for education and training is divided between two specialized governments departments, each headed by a Secretary of State: the Department for Children, Schools, and Families, with a remit for compulsory education and children's services; and the Department for Innovation, Universities, and Skills, with a remit for science, further and higher education, and skills training.

And then I have another one from 2012 that says the following:

Quote
In England the Department for Education and Employment is responsible for all levels of education. Universities, however, are self-governing and depend on the central government only for financial grants.

So, the first one says that the Department for Children, Schools, and Families is in charge of compulsory education and the Department of Innovation, Universities, and Schools is in charge of higher education. But the second article says that the Department of Education and Employment is in charge of all levels of education except for universities, which are in charge of themselves.

Which one is right? Or am I missing something? And if something changed to make the more recent one true, then what changed?

Thanks, you guys!

(Also, random side note: how close are you guys to Hull? There's a possibility I'll study there for a semester! :D)

EDIT: Also, looking at your list of school types, something doesn't seem right. Your age is a 14-years span, but for years-in-school, you only have 13 numbers?
« Last Edit: November 27, 2012, 05:31:58 PM by Vasha »

Unimaginative Username

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2012, 06:23:22 PM »
The first quote is wrong the second quote is definitely correct. The universities are independent and the Department of Education and Employment oversees all levels of education. The universities are; however, limited in the amount they charge: up to a maximum of 9500 per year per student.

As far as I am aware the Departments in the first quote do not exist.

As for the year span being inconsistent the first year is called 'reception'. Therefore, there is 13 numbered years plus the 'reception' year totalling 14 years altogether. I am not sure why they didn't just start at Year 1. Infant school is made up of three year groups: Reception, Year 1, and Year 2.



I live just south of London so I am not very close to Hull unfortunately.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2012, 06:26:59 PM by The-PurpleOrange »

Vasha

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2012, 04:05:33 PM »
Mmkay. Thanks for all the help, purp!

EDIT: And just to make sure, the GCSE grades are U,F,E,D,C,B, and A? (Ooh, and then Letter*s? So you could get something like a B*? Or is that just for As?) And the highest grade would be an A(*)? And the only way to get a U is to not have it graded (so... to not take the test?)

And for the SATs, how many letters were used? Could you just a #a-c, or did it use all the letters?
« Last Edit: November 28, 2012, 04:29:26 PM by Vasha »

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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2013, 06:50:43 PM »
Very good to search people from the forum To do your homework :platquack:
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Re: Education (Especially people from ENGLAND, but ALL WELCOME!)
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2013, 03:31:01 AM »
 
Very good to search people from the forum To do your homework :platquack:

Yes it is. Without any personal experience of a topic there is no way of knowing which sources are reliable or accurate the best course of action would be to ask someone who knows from personal experience instead of trawling through endless pages of information which possible could be incorrect if circumstances have changed since the source was written. Asking people who have had first hand experience of a topic allows more trustworthy information to be sourced and provides a way in which information found through other means can be verified. It helps ensure that all the data gathered for an essay or a speech is all correct at the time of writing.