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Games & Design => RM[XP/VX/MV] and Game Design => Topic started by: Nandog on September 06, 2011, 11:36:48 AM

Title: Music composer?
Post by: Nandog on September 06, 2011, 11:36:48 AM
Hiya~
I would like to know how do you compose music for your game.
I mean, is there any program out there to make 16-bit music?
I would love to start composing music to start my own game. (and use my tablet to do the faces  8) )
Title: Re: Music composer?
Post by: Reives on September 06, 2011, 01:10:13 PM
Hey Nan. I use Finale 2007 to compose, and then output with various VSTi (which are basically just a digital sound library of every note on different instruments to play back your pieces). For 16 bit music, though, there're probably more suitable tools. . . I'm not too sure, but perhaps http://flstudio.image-line.com/ (http://flstudio.image-line.com/) might be good for it? It can do a lot more other things too.
Title: Re: Music composer?
Post by: Ruben on September 06, 2011, 02:38:23 PM
Oh, I think there are quite a few 16-bit VST libraries out there. Basically, I have no clue how to properly use VST's and stuff, but I downloaded FL Studio a few months ago and important a 16-bit VST since I wanted to try it.

I didn't really have a good grasp how to use it, but I tried a bit and created a crappy pretty aweful 16-bit styled MP3 (13 seconds long). It didn't take me more than a few minutes. Here's the result:
 http://k003.kiwi6.com/hotlink/u2008r0ej7/8_bit.mp3 (http://k003.kiwi6.com/hotlink/u2008r0ej7/8_bit.mp3)

Really, it's not that hard, but if you want to compose something real, you will have to get a better understanding of the program. Finale Notepad, however, is really easy to use, but you will only be able to use a limited number of instruments with midi quality in the free version.

Title: Re: Music composer?
Post by: Merlandese on September 06, 2011, 03:40:47 PM
I felt like I was being attacked by 2-dimensional space aliens, Squall. It was awesome.
Title: Re: Music composer?
Post by: Kracken Kitty on September 07, 2011, 05:01:03 AM
Holy ****!!! *breaks out a gun and starts shooting some imaginary aliens* Lol, reminded me of Donkey Kong, where Mario tries to save the princess and Donky Kong's throwing barrels.
Title: Re: Music composer?
Post by: Nandog on September 07, 2011, 04:28:23 PM
Oh, I think there are quite a few 16-bit VST libraries out there. Basically, I have no clue how to properly use VST's and stuff, but I downloaded FL Studio a few months ago and important a 16-bit VST since I wanted to try it.

I didn't really have a good grasp how to use it, but I tried a bit and created a crappy pretty aweful 16-bit styled MP3 (13 seconds long). It didn't take me more than a few minutes. Here's the result:
 [url]http://k003.kiwi6.com/hotlink/u2008r0ej7/8_bit.mp3[/url] ([url]http://k003.kiwi6.com/hotlink/u2008r0ej7/8_bit.mp3[/url])

Really, it's not that hard, but if you want to compose something real, you will have to get a better understanding of the program. Finale Notepad, however, is really easy to use, but you will only be able to use a limited number of instruments with midi quality in the free version.




G-Gasp!
For some reason I thought of some creepy pokemon battle for a moment there-

Thanks guys, I'll try those!
Title: Re: Music composer?
Post by: dinnerordie17 on October 04, 2011, 10:24:24 PM
This might be a bit off topic but if I was too pay somebody to compose for me, on like an RPG Maker forum or an Indie Game Forum how much do you think that'd set me back?
Title: Re: Music composer?
Post by: Merlandese on October 05, 2011, 12:21:14 AM
One or two bazillion USD. :p

I imagine that'd be between you and the musician. how many songs you required, what your time constraints were, and how confident that composer felt about him/herself would also be factors.

You could also have multiple composers and discuss prices of songs individually, if you think that would be cheaper and more reliable. I know quite a few really good YouTube composers that might be up to the task making music for free, but probably not a whole soundtrack for free. Why not hold some auditions?

To give you a number, I'd say a previously non-employed indie composer would sell you 20-30 minutes of music for anywhere from $50-$100 bucks. They may want less if they think the game looks good enough that it'll land them some prestige, but they also might want a percentage of the income if it goes commercial.