Author Topic: Finding Paradise  (Read 5578 times)

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potatosaurus

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Finding Paradise
« on: December 14, 2017, 04:40:59 PM »
Amazing.  Loved it.

Chezecaek

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2017, 11:58:37 PM »
I also loved the game, especially how it complimented the themes and message of To the Moon. 

Spoilers ahead for Finding Paradise and To the Moon

While To the Moon is about a man who seeks to rewrite the story of his life as a means to escape from the sense of loss and betrayal that pervaded his last years on Earth, Finding Paradise is about a man (re)discovering his own ability to do the rewriting.  In the early years of his life, Colin uses his imagination to pave over the gaps that might otherwise make him feel lonely and depressed: the fact that he has no friends, that his parents are never there, and so on.  As the gaps begin to fill in on their own--he gets his dream job, marries his wife and has a kid--he no longer needs his imagination to give him the boost.  When he looks back upon his life from old age, he begins to see holes again--little regrets here and there--that he'd never noticed before.  While he at first seeks out Sigmund Corp to assist him in paving them over, he's ultimately reminded that the power to change his outlook on life lies with him, and not anybody else.

To the Moon is a story of a man who runs away, seeking solace in a fantasy because he can't deal with confronting reality.  The ultimate tragedy of that game is how its ending, pretending to be all joyful and glamorous, undermines the importance of life and the right of people to be remembered the way they were, flaws and all.  How can you say that a life truly meant anything if you can replace the whole thing, down to every moment, and claim that the recreation is just as good or even better than the reality?  In essence, To the Moon tells us the folly of relying on anyone or anything but ourselves to alter our perceptions of the past.  As a compliment to this, Finding Paradise reminds us of how much power we have to change those perceptions on our own. 

Because the very nature of its message is drastically different, Finding Paradise is a much brighter and optimistic game than To the Moon is.  Throughout the game, I kept expecting a hammer to fall, smashing my heart into a million pieces like it did when I played its predecessor; but that never happened.  While this was somewhat disappointing to me at first, the more I thought about it, the more it made sense to me why Kan wrote this game the way he did, and I think it's brilliant.

Now, did I like it as much as To the Moon?  Well, it's not worse, exactly.  But like I said, I liked the way that game tore out my heart, stomped on it, stuck it in a blender, stomped on it some more, put it in the oven...okay, you get the point.  Its ending me thinking, and crying, for days, and Finding Paradise just hasn't had quite the same effect on me.  There are other factors, too, such as the fact that Finding Paradise is the second in a series, and although it does its best to change things up, its narrative tricks are still familiar, and thus lack the same punch as when seeing them in play for the first time.  I also think that To the Moon just came at the right time in my life, due to a variety of factors, as to have the highest potential impact on me.  Last but not least was River, because I'm autistic and it was so great to see an autistic character portrayed so wonderfully, not to mention getting to see an autistic character in a romance story that doesn't end with him/her getting dumped. 

Oh yeah--so the overarching question of wtf's-going-on-with-neil got some...not exactly answers here, more like more questions raised, but it was still an interesting part of the game that got me excited to learn more.  Unfortunately, more may be six years more down the road, and may not be that much more at that, but as someone who loves these games I can handle the wait. 
« Last Edit: December 15, 2017, 12:18:59 AM by Chezecaek »

potatosaurus

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2017, 05:42:10 AM »
I'm actually going to go out on a limb and say something I've not seen anyone else saying:  Finding Paradise is better than To the Moon!!  Yep, you read that right!!  I say this because even though To the Moon is incredibly special to me and my favourite game of all time, the amount of progress Kan has made as a game developer is so clear to be seen in Finding Paradise, it's a total disservice not to acknowledge it.  The pacing; the depth and complexity of the story, all presented in a way that made sense to the player; the attention to detail in all of the scenes; the visuals and effects – I mean, everyone in reviews keeps picking on the limitations of the engine, but have they seen what was done despite those limitations?  To the Moon was visually brilliant, but Finding Paradise is just wow.  It's a step up in so many ways and makes me super excited to see where the next edition will go.

Unfortunately, because it IS a sequel to To the Moon, and because To the Moon had such a rave and emotional response, I think the knee-jerk reaction is “Well, it wasn't as good, it didn't make me feel the same things To the Moon did.”  Double unfortunately, the game isn't really able to stand on its own, as it's kind of structured and enacted on the presumption that everyone playing it has already played To the Moon and (possibly) A Bird Story.  If it had come first in the series, it wouldn't make any sense – we needed the build-up of To the Moon with its linear structure to be able to wrap our heads around the more complex slingshot-style back-and-forth storytelling.  We needed to be very familiar with how the memory mechanism was meant to work before we could understand all of this, so we needed to play To the Moon first.  I would confidently go as far as to say that the story of Finding Paradise is better developed and overall far superior in many ways to To the Moon, but I understand that it's difficult for anyone to get past the fact that it does rely on all that previous experience.  Kan is a brilliant storyteller and he really showed what he is capable of here; Finding Paradise is a narrative triumph.

It would be interesting to know how someone who plays Finding Paradise first would experience it; I'm sure they would have a totally different experience, but it might be a confusing one – I noticed there's not even any explanation how to connect all the mementos near the end (and this isn't a criticism, more of a nod again to the fact that it's not meant to be played as a standalone).  But I have to say as well, I actually liked all the little puzzles a lot better than To the Moon.

I also think that part of the reason not as many people are relating as deeply to the story is because Colin's circumstances are a bit more unusual than the protagonists of To the Moon.  To the Moon is a love story, essentially, and it touched so many people because everyone has at some point felt misunderstood in a relationship, unable to connect with someone the way that you want to connect.  Everyone is a lighthouse shining their light out hoping someone else will see.  It's a universal message.

I'm going to go out on a limb again and suggest that fewer people have experienced a childhood as intensely isolated as Colin's.

My childhood was actually quite similar to Colin's, minus the absentee family, so the messages and themes of Finding Paradise and A Bird Story both hit me straight where they were meant to.  They both made me cry a lot.

VEERING INTO SPOILER TERRITORY, also as a note going forward, just so the following doesn't seem to be based entirely on unfounded opinion rather than well-researched fact, I'm a professional therapist with 5+ years experience looking to move into clinical psychology:  Colin's not schizophrenic, he's just intensely lonely.  I believe Eva actually comments at one point that his creations are a defensive mechanism rather than schizophrenia, and she's spot on.  Kan knows his stuff.  A schizophrenic hallucination interacts with the person experiencing them – they talk to them, they can hear them, see them, sense them.  Parts of the brain associated with listening to real voices are activated during a schizophrenic auditory hallucination.  But towards the end, his friend comments to him “You could never hear me play [the music]” - and also during the final sequence we see his memories of her for what they really were, albeit briefly, when we see Colin sitting beneath the barren tree writing his story by himself.  That was the real memory, though it was well-hidden.  She was never really there, and he was never under the delusion that she really was – it's just that his stories were so powerful to him that when we see his memories going back, she's there: living, breathing, talking.  She's as real as a real person to him in his mind, but only in his mind.

To go back to psychology talk, escaping into fantasy is a classic safeguarding mechanism – that is, something people do when things are going wrong to try to support themselves better.  Nowadays some people want to categorise what Colin experienced as a disorder, Maladaptive Daydreaming, or “MADD” (rather unfortunate acronym if you ask me, as I'm always skeptical that anyone is truly 'mad').  But it's actually not that uncommon.  Someone who is alone and unhappy and creative is going to retreat into their mind and make a better life for themselves.  I used to write stories, too, and imagine my characters so vividly they could be standing beside me.  I still do, and lots of my friends who have also been lonely and creative do the same; even though we're in our late twenties now, we still write stories together.  And just like for Colin, the question of “aren't we a bit old for this?” has come up.  But, just like Colin found, the only way to really abandon that mechanism is to experience change in your life that makes it obsolete.  To some people, maybe their fantasies won't ever be obsolete.  Colin, however, managed to find a fulfilling life, and in this way I think that Finding Paradise has an incredibly powerful message for people who have been through the same thing as him: that even if you're an extremely isolated, lonely child, you can still go on and have a fully fulfilled life.

Those are just some of my thoughts, I hope others find them interesting.  But I really just posted my first message here because I wanted the game creator to know how much this sequel meant to me and how glad I am that it exists.  And I posted again because I don't want him to be put off by all of the reviews saying “it's not as good” or “it didn't make me feel the same things/as intensely as TTM.”  Finding Paradise is a masterpiece in its own right and I will wait and wait and wait and wait for the next magnificent instalment of this story.

bashfluff

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2017, 06:09:27 AM »
I didn't like it.

Spoil spoil spoil spoiler warning. I've been as vague as I can be, but if you want to go in blind, don't read this.




To the Moon had something this game didn't. When you played To the Moon, you got the sense that there was something about Johnny's wish that set him apart from everyone else. His life was miserable and you get to see how bad it gets in unflinching detail as you try to figure out why he wanted to go to the moon and what was causing the bad things to happen in his life.  No matter how far back you'd go in Johnny's memories, you'd always be left with more questions than answers, and that combination of mystery and tragedy made for a hell of an emotional gut-punch.

It hit once, and it hit hard. It was the culmination of four hours of well-written build up, so it rested on the strength of that one moment. You don't often see that amount of dedication to focus and restraint, and it really paid off.

Finding Paradise doesn't have that. It almost seems like it's going to when it makes a mystery of what Colin's wish is and the weirdness surrounding what it is, but then they take that away not long after.  It asks why such a happy person had such regrets, but it sucks out all the tension when you see Colin's past.  Sure, you may not know exactly what happened at that point and the exact events that led to it, but everything other than those particulars are so obvious that it left me a little bored. It almost felt like the characters were feeling the same way, offering pretty mundane observations when they bothered to speak at all about the memories themselves, not seeming to understand why Colin came to them in the first place.

The game goes back and forth to show us Colin's life, and it's not a bad life. Some of the short segments were nice experiences, but without the context of the central focus around which those experiences are built, it rung hollow. It felt like a highlight reel for a pretty good life, and things were set up so that I wasn't asking any questions other than if the twist was going to be any good. After answering every question I had after an hour or so in, all the game could do was show Colin's happy life and make us wait for it.

This criticism may be the most subjective, but I felt the twist was more than a little silly and took me out of the experience. I'm someone who's happy to suspend their disbelief in fiction, but there's a limit, and after that real and human drama of the first game, especially at the moment of the twist, doing something so outlandish wasn't a great idea in my book. I was also disappointed by how it repeats what happened in To the Moon when problems crop up in the dreamscape again. It retroactively made that moment in To the Moon less special as a result, too, at least for me.

I do have smaller criticisms.

Colin's childhood friend gets less mischievous and more generic as the game goes on. It's annoying to see that happen to such an enjoyable character, and there doesn't seem to be much of a reason for it. The puzzles don't add anything to the gameplay at all. If they were spaced out better, maybe they'd make for some nice quiet time so that we can think about what we just saw and what may come next, but they just felt like finicky distractions. There are a few interactive sections, and they just go on far too long and took up too much time for something that felt like it was meant to be quirky and fun.

The whole situation is a little unfortunate. There are enjoyable moments in Finding Paradise, but the type of enjoyment I got from them felt like the icing for a cake that wasn't there. Maybe I'm being a bit harsh on the game, but even if I didn't go into it with high expectations, I feel as if I would still be disappointed. As it stands, this is the most disappointed I've been in a game.

Take that for what its worth. People do seem to love it, if the Steam reviews I was linked are any indication, but I hope that the setup for the much more interesting-sounding sequel won't go to waste.

In conclusion, I think this type of story needs to be focused on a character that has lived a less than ideal life. We have to get a good sense for why this person feels like they have regrets so immense that they need the services of Neil and Eva, and we should have to get to the source of the problems in a way that makes us constantly ask questions about how to fix the person's broken life as well as how things got so broken to start with.

That's the biggest misstep of Finding Paradise, for me. It wasn't about how it wasn't emotionally engaging, but how it wasn't intellectually engaging. A story without focus isn't much of a story at all, and when the story is the sequel to something that seemed to have a perfect understanding of that, it's baffling as to why things so basic and essential to this type of story just weren't there.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2017, 06:25:19 AM by bashfluff »

Leave Me Alone

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2017, 07:21:36 AM »
I'm mixed about this game. While it is technically better made than it's predecessor, I thought it was a step back in the most critical aspects, namely the music and writing. I'll play through it a few more times and try to figure out what the little details are supposed to represent. Then I'll write a long, detailed review, somewhat similar to Rakuen's. Rakuen's ended up over 10,000 words long, but I thought that Rakuen was a very flawed game. This one should be shorter.

Mobbstar

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2017, 08:35:34 AM »
I didn't like it. [...]

Yeah, I agree on the disappointing developement. It started well in my opinion, but the middle of the story is just... frayed? Feels a bit barren and leaves some loose ends that only get picked up again near the end. Then again, I think just about every second movie in a trilogy has this problem as well.
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EatingToastYay

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2017, 09:23:50 AM »
To be honest, I probably shouldn't be posting a review of Finding Paradise in any form, but...

I liked this game quite a bit. Perhaps because I do relate to many of Colin's experiences. (Which I won't spoil here.) The mystery in my opinion was the wish itself, trying to pick apart why exactly he felt that he needed Sigmund Corp, and the answer to it was interesting to me, raising questions not only about the way people think about and see their lives in general, but also about SigCorp's universe and Eva and Neil's jobs.

Yes, To The Moon brought the "feels". I cried at TtM, but if one thinks about it, wasn't its premise, twist, and wish the more outlandish one? Literally, it (spoilers here, don't open if you haven't played. I also recommend To The Moon)
Spoiler: show

involves John having a twin who got run over that he almost totally forgot about due to a medication (which doesn't really do that btw),
meeting a girl one time, then managing to meet her again but only years later, getting together with her despite having extreme and unresolved difficulty communicating with her, then wishing to travel to the moon for the sole purpose of seeing her again, which he must know is physically impossible (and had the doctors not understood what he meant by it, could have been entirely unfulfilling and sad).

And Colin only wished for something seemingly simple, yet vague and confusing enough to need thought about his reasons. John's motivation was obvious by the end of the story. Colin's was a bit more muddy. But which one is really more realistic? Don't we have more than one influence on our wishes, hopes, dreams?

Eva and Neil's relationship is about on the same level as previously, perhaps more tense though. Their overarching storyline is currently raising more questions than answers, and admittedly was slightly distracting from Colin's story, if only because it was so intriguing. If you didn't like them before, you won't like them any more now, but if you did their continued chemistry and comic relief should be enjoyable.

The gameplay is similar as previously; a little better adapted, as now the number of memory links is variable, so the scene doesn't need to have a bunch made up if it doesn't need them. There's match-3 puzzles in between each memory, which I struggled with a little, maybe I liked the tile-flipping slightly more. But it's more complex than before, and certainly took a lot of work to implement. Near the end there are some incongruous sections of gameplay that don't quite fit in with the overall mood of the story, and perhaps were a bit extraneous. I wonder if Reives just needed a break for himself, to do something different and fun(at least to put in the game, if not for the player). He had been working on FP for several years, after all.

Involving the dialogue, most of it flowed well and sounded human. There were some thematically involved lines that did sound a bit too direct and obviously underlined what you are supposed to get out of the story. Instead of speaking directly to each other with natural phrases, sometimes they mention things directly about "life" and general, universal wonderings that don't usually pop up out of nowhere in a conversation unless you're looking to discuss them. Other than that, characters transition from funny to touching, sarcastic and sincere - I loved it.

Finding Paradise will likely instill varying emotions for different people. In a way, it is for a narrower audience than To the Moon and is not for everyone. But I think it's still worth trying for everyone. It's not a huge time drain-- about 5-7 hours depending on how quickly you move through the stages -- and the story it has to tell is unique from the previous installment and just as carefully thought out. The emotional core lies in a different spot, and perhaps is arguably weaker, but still exists in a fairly strong capacity. In general, this game probably requires more literary-analysis style thinking than before, making it less accessible, but reaches slightly deeper in terms of philosophy. At least, to me it does.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2017, 09:29:07 AM by EatingToastYay »

TheFlyingMarlin

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2017, 09:30:36 AM »
It's interesting to see how less than 24 hours after the game's release, there is quite a bit of discussion about the effect the game has. I might spend a bit more time (maybe not though :P ) writing down my thoughts on the game in the future, but I will say that it felt much less saccharine than TtM. I'm not sure if I like Finding Paradise more than TtM though (I've changed quite a bit since I first played TtM, so there's that too), but I was satisfied and pleasantly surprised how different the storytelling format was from TtM.


Leave Me Alone

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2017, 10:20:34 AM »
I'm avoiding judging FP at how good it is at being TtM. That's a pointless comparison, and if all it did was try to be TtM, then it wouldn't even have its own identity. I'm on a much more detailed, note taking 2nd playthrough now, trying to sieve the real from the imaginary. I'll think more about it later. There have been titles where I didn't like at first, but came to love afterwards, QTBV being one of them.

What I do know is that right now, if a friend asked me which Freebird title, TtM or FP, they should play first, I would definitely recommend TtM, and not because of their sequence.

bashfluff

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2017, 12:24:24 PM »
Spoilers below for To the Moon and Finding Paradise!


The mystery in my opinion was the wish itself, trying to pick apart why exactly he felt that he needed Sigmund Corp, and the answer to it was interesting to me, raising questions not only about the way people think about and see their lives in general, but also about SigCorp's universe and Eva and Neil's jobs.

That may have worked if the game presented it as a mystery or as if there was more than he was telling us. It doesn't, and there isn't. Colin says that he's lived a happy life and doesn't want to change any of it. What he wants is to be happy with his life without living another one, for all of his small regrets to be fixed. When we look at his life, that's exactly what we see: a happy life, and the bit about regrets doesn't come up much except for the ending and the names of some of the notes. It doesn't feel fleshed out at all and almost feels like a red herring, but it shows up in a prominent place in the ending, so I'll just call it underdeveloped.


Yes, To The Moon brought the "feels". I cried at TtM, but if one thinks about it, wasn't its premise, twist, and wish the more outlandish one?

No. Beta blockers do cause people to forget fearful memories, and side effects from messing around with memories makes enough sense. When it comes to River, it doesn't feel outlandish to me when you consider how the two connected and how much she wanted to be connected to someone. Humans can have complex relationships that aren't always entirely logical.

I'm not sure you've given To the Moon a replay lately. Johnny doesn't want to go to the moon to meet River again on the conscious level.  It's not a unrealistic desire that he hasn't thought through the consequences of. He doesn't remember why his wish was to go there in the first place, because that wish comes from a memory that he'd suppressed. Johnny wanted to go to the moon since some part of him remembered it's where River and him agreed to meet when they were kids if they ever got separated.  After living a life disconnected from the only person he'd had a real bond with, it shows that what he really wished for was to live a life where they were happy together.

There's no part of that story that I consider unbelievable. It's based in facts and the liberties it takes are fairly small, and it helps that those exaggerations revolve around something that is volatile, highly personal, and not well understood: human memory.

Compare this to Finding Paradise, where, somehow, Colin's imaginary friend manifests as a real person in his memories when the game shows that's never how he saw her in his past. It would make more sense if he did, since a kid writing to himself to tell himself to grow up and to stop living in a fantasy world seems odd to me, but that's how his actual memories played out.

So she's not much of an imaginary friend, really--she's a character in a book. A character who becomes self-aware in his mind and starts to control part of Colin's subconscious, too, and I can't even begin to explain how little sense that makes. It only gets worse when she talks about how she had to 'leave him' or that they'd meet again when he was denying to talk about his life. Or that there's innumerable hints about how she's the personification of the bird he let go in A Bird's Story.

If I had to guess, I'd say that Reives had considered making her an imaginary friend, but didn't want Colin to come off as crazy or mentally ill. I'd also guess that he'd considered playing up Colin not understanding what exactly he wanted and why he felt unfulfilled, but probably decided that it was too similar to TtM and scrapped it.


Finding Paradise will likely instill varying emotions for different people. In a way, it is for a narrower audience than To the Moon and is not for everyone. But I think it's still worth trying for everyone. In general, this game probably requires more literary-analysis style thinking than before, making it less accessible, but reaches slightly deeper in terms of philosophy. At least, to me it does.

I've never liked it much when people say that something isn't for everyone. Few people would be considered the audience for story-based RPG Maker games, but To the Moon reached beyond that audience by telling a story that was creative, well-told, and emotionally complex. Every game has the chance to make you care about something that you haven't before, and I believe every game has that potential when presented in the right way.

It's why the remake of X-COM, a hardcore strategy game from the 90's, was able to capture the appeal of the originals while attracting a mainstream audience who had likely never understood why people enjoyed games like X-COM in the first place. It's why The Stanley Parable typically isn't grouped in with 'Walking Simulators' by people who don't like those types of games.

Also, as someone who does a good deal of editing and literary analysis, I don't see that at all. It doesn't seem muddled because it's vague and open to interpretation as much as the theme not being particularly well-supported in the narrative to start with.

There are a few things that are open to interpretation, though. Did he just want to connect with Faye and knew he was unable to himself, or was it that Sigmund planted ideas in his head that influenced how he felt dissatisfied? It seems pretty clear that he's often thinking about her, off in his own little world, but what it isn't clear is why. The game makes sure to mention that he'd lost his only friend and could never tell anyone about her. 'Some stories aren't meant to be told', as she herself says, and Colin does write about meeting her in his green book as his last entry. All the same, when Sigmund isn't part of his life, it's clear that he lives a happier life while still remembering her and still seems to be less spacey.

...even though he only ever found out about Sigmund later in his life anyway, which shouldn't cause him to live most of his life much differently than before.

Either way, the general idea behind it is straightforward enough, and only the minor points are what seem muddled on purpose. It's really a lack of focus on the theme that kills it for me.

FirmlyGroundedAspie

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2017, 03:55:06 PM »
So, Finding Paradise ended up not resolving the Neil story arc, what exactly the machine and the secrecy was for, and that pill thing. I think some parts of the game dragged on for a bit longer than they had to; on the flip side I liked the little allusions to TtM: Avoiding the squirrel in the beginning, and Colin knew River *sniffle*. Neil's "character customization" improvement was hilarious.

All in all, I'm less sure that I'll play FP again than I was with TtM. If I end up trying, I may write some more in here.

TheFlyingMarlin

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2017, 06:41:57 PM »
Another interesting thought I had this morning about the game:
Spoiler: show

I noticed how it addressed a question which came up in my head after playing TtM, and I noticed that some YouTubers raised the question after playing TtM (such as Markiplier). Specifically it's the question on whether it's better to die believing you lived a life without regrets which was a lie, or to die with a life filled with regrets which you genuinely lived. I feel like this is an inherent question in the premise of altering memories prior to death, and its ethical implications have been heavily touched upon in the minisodes. I'm looking forward to seeing what other questions will be addressed in the future.
 

StarwindD6

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2017, 09:12:45 PM »
So, Finding Paradise ended up not resolving the Neil story arc, what exactly the machine and the secrecy was for, and that pill thing. I think some parts of the game dragged on for a bit longer than they had to; on the flip side I liked the little allusions to TtM: Avoiding the squirrel in the beginning, and Colin knew River *sniffle*. Neil's "character customization" improvement was hilarious.

All in all, I'm less sure that I'll play FP again than I was with TtM. If I end up trying, I may write some more in here.

Just for a clarification, is the part about Colin knowing River from when he mentioned how he had to switch seats with "the quiet kid who started talking alot"? (The quiet kid being River who had just met Johnny and started to talk?)

FirmlyGroundedAspie

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2017, 09:32:37 PM »
Just for a clarification, is the part about Colin knowing River from when he mentioned how he had to switch seats with "the quiet kid who started talking alot"? (The quiet kid being River who had just met Johnny and started to talk?)
Well, the text says "Well, I sat with this odd girl cause we're both really quiet", not that she didn't talk. Only that she had started hanging out with a boy (Johnny). Non-verbal autistic people are a thing, but River isn't one of them.

Kirroha

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Re: Finding Paradise
« Reply #14 on: December 15, 2017, 10:27:22 PM »
Hmm, I genuinely found Finding Paradise better than To the Moon - with both being great.

Spoiler: show
Finding Paradise is the opposite of To the Moon in some ways and gives off a different message, but I find it a lot more relateable as a person who doesn't generally relate as much to romance stories but can genuinely empathize with a person who relies on their imagination to cope with reality in their formative years, so I find Finding Paradise especially poignant. I also find that Kan has improved tremendously as a writer between 2011 and now - with all the dialogue flowing much better and the scenes feeling more realistic in general. To each their own, I guess. I'm just going to second what bashfluff said about how this game really resonates with people who have had experiences like this, and I find that Finding Paradise has been as successful at demonstrating that as some other stories that deal with this theme.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2017, 01:04:38 PM by Kirroha »

 


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